SemesterSpring Semester, 2021
DepartmentInternational Master's Program in International Studies, First Year International Master's Program in International Studies, Second Year
Course NameChinese Communists' Study on Theories of International Relations
InstructorTENG CHUNG-CHIAN
Credit3.0
Course TypeElective
Prerequisite
Course Objective
Course Description
Course Schedule

Week One 二月二十四日



Course Introduction



 



Week Two  三月三日



China’s Grand Strategy (1) 



Avery Goldstein, “China’s Changing Strategic Landscape,” in Rising to the Challenge: China’s Grand Strategy and International Security.



Avery Goldstein, “Stimuli for a New Strategy,” in Rising to the Challenge: China’s Grand Strategy and International Security.



Shiping Hua, “The Chinese One World View and Foreign Policy,” in Dancing with the Dragon.



Kevin G. Cai, “The One Belt One Road and the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank: Beijing’s New Strategy of Geoeconomics and Geopolitics,” Journal of Contemporary China, 27:114 (2018), 831-847



Yizheng Zou & Lee Jones, “China’s response to Threats to Its Overseas Economic Interests: Softening Non-Interference and Cultivating Hegemony,” Journal of Contemporary China, 29:121, 92-108. 



 



Week Three  三月十日



China’s Grand Strategy (2)



Feng Liu, “The recalibration of Chinese assertiveness: China’s responses to the Indo-Pacific challenge,’ International Affairs, 96:1 (2020)



Kei Koga, “Japan’s ‘Indo-Pacific’ question: countering China or shaping a new regional order? ’ International Affairs, 96:1 (2020)



Rajesh Rajagopalan, “India’s unviable Indo-Pacific strategy,” International Affairs, 96:1 (2020)



Brendan Taylor, “Is Australia’s Indo-Pacific strategy an illusion?” International Affairs, 96:1 (2020)



See Seng Tan, “Consigned to hedge: south-east Asia and America’s ‘free and open Indo-Pacific strategy,” International Affairs, 96:1 (2020)



 



Week Four 三月十七日



China’s Security Environment: Taiwan



Su Chi, “Conciliation in cross-strait relations,” & “Conclusion: six variables,” in Taiwan’s Relations with Mainland China   



Shelley Rigger, “An Opportunity Full of Threats: Cross-Strait Economic Interaction,” in Why Taiwan Matters



Scott W. Harold, Lyle J. Morris, Logan Ma, Countering China’s Efforts to Isolate Taiwan Diplomatically in Latin America and the Caribbean: the Role of Development Assistance and Disaster Relief. Santa Monica, CA: Rand Corporation, 2019.



 



Week Five  三月二十四日



Nationalism & China’s Foreign Relations (1)   



Suisheng Zhao, “Chinese Nationalism and Pragmatic Foreign Policy Behavior,” in Chinese Foreign Policy: Pragmatism and Strategic Behavior, edited by Suisheng Zhao.



Peter H. Gries, “Nationalism and Chinese Foreign Policy, ‘ in China Rising.



 



Week Six 三月三十一日



Nationalism & China’s Foreign Relations (2)



Alastair Iain Johnston, “Is Chinese Nationalism Rising? Evidence from Beijing” International Security, Vol.41 No.3 (Winter, 2016/2017): 7-43.



Duan Xiaolin, “Unanswered Questions: Why We may be Wrong about Chinese Nationalism and its Foreign Policy Implications, Journal of Contemporary China, 26:108(2017), 886-900.



 



Week Seven  四月七日



China’s Material Power 



Shirk, Susan L., “China’s Economic Miracle,” in China: Fragile Superpower.



Friedrich Wu & Koh De Wei. “From Financial Assets to Financial statecraft: the case of China and emerging economies of Africa and Latin America,” Journal of Contemporary China, Vol. 23, No. 89, March 2014, pp. 781-803.



Thomas P. Narins, “The lure of Chinese state capitalism in Latin America and the Caribbean,” Territory, Politics, Governance, (January 2020). DOI: 10.1080/21622671.2020.1719192. .  



 



 



Week Eight  四月十四日



China’s Soft Power 



Pu, Xiaoyu, “China on the World Stage: Multiple Audiences, Competing Expectations,” in Rebranding China



Nathan & Scobell, “Soft Power and Human Rights in Chinese Foreign Policy,” in China’s Search for Security



Jih-Un Kim, “When Soft Power Meets Nationalism” in Dancing with the Dragon 



Hongying Wang & Yeh-Chung Lu, “The Conception of Soft Power and its Policy Implications: a comparative study of China and Taiwan,” Journal of Contemporary China, 17:56 (2008), 425-447,



 



Week Nine  四月二十一日



China in International Society 



Suisheng Zhao, “ Beijing’s Perception of the International System and Foreign Policy Adjustment after Tiananmen Incident,” in Chinese Foreign Policy: Pragmatism and Strategic Behavior, edited by Suisheng Zhao.



Allen Carlson, “Constructing the Dragon’s Scales: China’s Approach to Territorial Sovereignty and Border Relations,” in Chinese Foreign Policy: Pragmatism and Strategic Behavior, edited by Suisheng Zhao.



Thomas G. Moore & Dixia Yang, “Empowered and Restrained: Chinese Foreign Policy in the Age of Economic Interdependence,” in The Making of Chinese Foreign and Security Policy, Edited by David M. Lampton.



 



 



Week Ten 四月二十八日



China and Major Powers (1) : U.S.  



Peter H. Gries, “Chinese Nationalism and U.S. China Relations,” in China’s New Nationalism



Nathan & Scobell, “Deciphering the U.S. Threat,” in China’s Search for Security



Kai He (2017) “Explaining United States–China relations: neoclassical realism and the nexus of threat–interest perceptions,” The Pacific Review, 30:2, 133-151



Yichen Guan and others (2020). “Chinese views of the United States: evidence from Weibo,” International Relations of the Asia-Pacific, 20:1, 1-30.



 



Week Eleven  五月五日



China and Major Powers (2) : Russia.



Lowell Dittmer, “ Ghost of the Strategic Triangle: The Sino-Russian Partnership,” in Chinese Foreign Policy: Pragmatism and Strategic Behavior, edited by Suisheng Zhao



Nathan & Scobell, “Life on the Hinge: China’s Russia Policy During the Cold War and After,” in China’s Search for Security



 



Week Twelve  五月十二日



China and Major Powers (3) : Japan   



Mike Mochizuki, “China-Japan Relations,” in Power Shift.



Michael Yahuda, “The Limits of Economic Interdependence,” New Directions in the Study of China’s Foreign Policy.



Jianwei Wang & Xiaojie Wang, “Media and Chinese Foreign Policy,” Journal of Contemporary China, Vol.23 No.86 (2014):216-235. 



 



Week Thirteen  五月十九日



China and Peripheral Nations (1)



Derek Mitchell and Carola McGiffert., “Expanding the ‘Strategic Periphery’: a History of China’s Interaction with the Developing World,” in China and the Developing World, pp. 3-25. Edited by Joshua Eisenman & others. 



Zhu Zhiqun, “China and the Southeast Asia” in China’s New Diplomacy.



 



Week Fourteen  五月二十六日



China and Peripheral Nations (2)



Chris Alden, “China’s New Engagement with Africa,” in China’s Expansion into the Western Hemisphere.



Zhu Zhiqun, “China and Africa” in China’s New Diplomacy.



 



Week Fifteen  六月二日



China and Peripheral Nations (3)



Chung-chian Teng, “Hegemony or Partnership,” in China and the Developing World, pp. 84-112. Edited by Joshua Eisenman & others.



Gonzalo Sebastian Paz. “China, United States and Hegemonic Challenge in Latin America,” China Quarterly, No. 209, March 2012, pp. 18-34.



Jean-Marc F. Blanchard, “The Politics of Latin America’s Investment and Other Links with China: Contextualizing the Region’s Cash Chasing while Racking Richer Research Rewards,” Journal of Chinese Political Science 24 (2019), 565-582.



 



Week Sixteen  六月九日



Final Review: China and Global Society: Economy and Trade   



 



Week Seventeen  六月十六日



Final Review: China and Global Society: Security



 



Week Eighteen  六月二十三日



Final Examination



 



 



 



 



 


Teaching Methods
Teaching Assistant
Requirement/Grading

(1) Seminar attendance/participation 5%;



(2) In-class review report and presentation (30%): 2-3 pages summery and critique of assigned reading each week 



(3) Take-home exam (35%): The questions will be distributed in class on June 16, 2021. Your answer will be due on June 23, 2021 through e-mail to both professors.



(4) One Article Reviews (30%) : 3-4 pages each, single spaced, 12-point Times New Roman. Choose from any article, which is not listed in the reading list. Article review is due on June 16, 2021.


Textbook & Reference

Deng, Yong (Ed.) . China Rising. New York: Rowman & Littlefield, 2005.(327.510090511 C.539)



Eisenman, Joshua, Eric Heginbotham, & Derek Mitchell (Eds.) China and the Developing World: Beijing’s Strategy for the Twenty-First Century. New York: M. E. Sharpe, 2007. (337.5101724 C539)



Friedberg, Aaron L. in A Contest for Supremacy. New York: W. W. Norton, 2011. (327.5105 F899)



Gill, Bates. Rising Star: China’s New Security Diplomacy. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution Press, 2007. 



Goldstein, Avery. Rising to the Challenge: China’s Grand Strategy and International Security. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2005. (355.033051 G624)



Gries, Peter Hays. China’s New Nationalism. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2004. (320.540951 G848)



Guo, Baogang & Chung-chian Teng (Eds.) China’s Quiet Rise: Peace through Integration. New York: Lexington Books, 2011. (327.51 C539-XXI)



Halper, Stefan. The Beijing Consensus: How China’s Authoritarian Model Will Dominate The Twenty-First Century. New York: Basic Books, 2010. (327.51 H195)



Hickey, Dennis & Baogang Guo (Eds.) Dancing with the Dragon: China’s Emergence in the Developing World. New York: Lexington Books, 2010.(337.5101724 D173)



Johnston, Alastair J. & Robeert S. Ross (Eds.) New Directions in the Study of China’s Foreign Policy. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2006. (327.51 N532)



Kastner, Scott. Political Conflict and Economic Interdependence Across the Taiwan Strait and Beyond. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2009. (337.51051249 K19)



Lampton, David M. The Three Faces of Chinese Power. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2008. (327.51 L239)



Lampton, David M. (Ed.) The Making of Chinese Foreign and Security Policy. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2001.  (327.51 M235) 



Moisi, Dominique. The Geopolitics of Emotion. New York: Anchor Books, 2010. (303.482 M714)



Nathan, Andrew J. & Andres Scobell. China’s Search for Security. New York: Columbia University Press, 2012. ()



Rigger, Shelley. Why Taiwan Matters: Small Island, Global Powerhouse. New York: Rowman & Littlefield, 2011. (951.24905 R569)



Pu, Xiaoyu. Rebranding China: Contested Status in the Changing Global Order. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2019.



Roett, Riordan & Guadalupe Paz (Eds.) China’s Expansion into the Western Hemisphere. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution Press, 2008. (337.5107 C539)



Shambaugh, David (Ed.) Power Shift. Los Angeles, CA: University of California Press, 2005. (327.5051 P887)



Shirk, Susan L. China: Fragile Superpower. New York: Oxford University Press, 2007.  (320.951 S558) 



Su, Chi. Taiwan’s Relations with Mainland China. New York: Routledge, 2009. (327.51249051 S938)



Tucker, Nancy B. (Ed.) Dangerous Strait: The U.S.-Taiwan-China Crisis. New York: Columbia University Press, 2005. (327.7305109045 D182)



Zhao, Quansheng. Interpreting Chinese Foreign Policy. New York: Oxford University Press, 1996. (327.51 Z63)



Zhao, Suisheng (Ed.) Chinese Foreign Policy: Pragmatism and Strategic Behavior. New York: M. E. Sharpe, 2004. (327.51 C539-V)



Zhu, Zhiqun. China’s New Diplomacy: Rationale, Strategies and Significance, Second Edition. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2013.  


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